Showing posts with label Afghan Hound. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Afghan Hound. Show all posts

Sunday, March 20, 2016

AFGHAN HOUND

The Afghan Hound dog breed is a very distinctive looking dog, and once seen you would not mistake them for another breed. Their height is a substantial 24 to 29 inches and they should weigh between 44 to 59 lbs. Whilst their coat can be any colour white markings are discouraged, especially in the head region. There are a lot of afghan hounds that have facial hair resembling a Manchu moustache, which are known as 'mandarins'.

Nadia Color Version
Photo  by diveofficer 
Another, fairly common, characteristic is hair that resembles a black face mask. With white afghans, or nearly white, but if they display red or black islands in the fur, they are not acceptable as this is indicative of impure breeding. Other distinctive characteristics of the Afghan are a long head hair with the hair shortening, slightly, as you go from the front to back of the dog. There is also a small ring appearance at the end of their tail which is unique to this breed.

History: 
The Afghan hound as its name would suggest, came from Afghanistan, and was introduced to Great Britain in the 1920s. It is believed, via genetic testing, that the original Afghans, known as sight dogs in Afghanistan, had several genetic markers in common with wolves, making them close descendants of the original dog. 

Although the modern hounds were selectively bred, from those originally brought over. The exceptional beauty of these dogs has made them very popular as show dogs, and they are accredited at all major kennel clubs throughout the English speaking world. Afghan hounds were very important early on and formed an important breed in the earliest dog shows and the beginnings of the UK kennel club.

Temperament: 
The Afghan tends to integrate well at home, with the family, but can be aloof almost snobbish. It tends to get on well enough with other animals in the house, but when outside it likes chasing small animals. It was originally bred for hunting and when in the open cannot help reverting to type. They are an intelligent dog and will sometimes ignore commands, especially when coming from someone who is not their normal handler, it is more a case that they can see no reason to obey, it is not deliberate disobedience. Because of this trait, probably, they have often been described as cat like in their attitude. They also have a bit of a tendency towards destruction and vandalism when bored.

Health issues: 
The Afghan Hound have been known to suffer necrotic myelopathy, but this is rare. There only real health issue is they can suffer cataracts.

Grooming: 
Given their superb coat and length of the hair, grooming is obviously important to the Afghan Hound dog. Leaving them un-groomed for too long will make the task that much harder when you do brush them. It is best to brush them every couple of days. Whilst home grooming is always possible, if you want your pet to look their best, then take them to a reliable dog salon for trimming.


Living conditions: 
While the Afghan Hound breed was originally a hunter and lived outside, it was in a temperate climate. Their hair is long and luxurious, but they seem to favour warm, rather than just not too cold. They are not really suited to living outdoors, and I am sure you would quickly notice how they like a nice warm, soft bed.

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    Afghan Hound - Puppies or Dogs
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Thursday, February 25, 2016

The AFGHAN HOUND History, Origin, and Breed Information

Origin:

The Afghan Hound is a very ancient breed. This dog has been mentioned several times in the Egyptian papyruses as well as pictured in caves of Northern Afganistan more than 4,000 years ago. This beautiful sighthound was used as a shepard and hunter for many centuries, hunting such game as deer, wild boars, goats, and even wolves. They were also used by shepards as watchdogs and herders due to their fast and agile running. History: The Afghan was discovered in the west on the regions of Afganistan in during the 19th century.

A portrait of an Afghan Hound.
A portrait of an Afghan Hound. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
These dogs were later sent to England in the later part of the century. Some say that Afghan Hounds served as guard dogs and herd dogs, which are within the capabilities of the breed as we know it. The major role of these dogs, however, was undoubtedly that of hunting. The Afganistan kings would breed a kennel of these hounds for many generations with these purposes alone.

History:

The Afghan was discovered in the west on the regions of Afghanistan in during the 19th century. These dogs were later sent to England in the later part of the century. Some say that Afghan Hounds served as guard dogs and herd dogs, which are within the capabilities of the breed as we know it. The major role of these dogs, however, was undoubtedly that of hunting. The Afghanistan kings would breed a kennel of these hounds for many generations with these purposes alone.

The real start of the breed in the US started with the first Ghazni imports in 1931, when Zeppo Marx and his wife brought from England a bitch, Asra of Ghazni, and a dog, Westmill Omar. Asra and Omar were later acquired by Q. A. Shaw McKeans Prides Hill kennels in Massachusetts. Mr. McKean soon added a young English champion, Badshah of Ainsdart. These three - Asra, Omar and Badshah - formed the cornerstone of the breed in America.

Summary:

This dog has become a luxurious pet in America and Europe due its aristocratic look. The Afghan Hound is prized and loved by many of their owners and family members. With its distinctive personality and long coat that requires regular care and maitenance, its not the breed for want to-be dog owners, but when the matchup between owner and this hound is right, there is no other dog that can equal the Afghan hound as a great and welcome addition to any family.



Aristocratic, but very sweet, loyal, affectionate and emotional, with a low dominance level. The Afghan Hound has been described as "a king of dogs." Majestic, elegant, noble and courageous, suspicious of, but not hostile to, strangers. Although resilient, they will pine if they are deprived of attention. They will do best with more mature, considerate children. At one time, the breed had a reputation for being untrustworthy, but has now been replaced by a character that, while still energetic, is said to be more agreeable to training and discipline, as they can be disobedient if allowed to do so. This breed can be problematic to housebreak.


    By John Hinkley

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