Showing posts with label Border Collie. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Border Collie. Show all posts

Saturday, June 4, 2016

BORDER COLLIE - The Facts Every Owner of this Dog Breed Should Know

Bred for their intelligence and herding instincts, Border Collies are descended from British herding dogs. A medium sized dog, Border Collies will grow to about 19 to 22 inches and 30 to 45 pounds. They will live about 12 to 15 years. Border Collies have medium to longer hair that comes in a variety of colors and are prone to shedding. Border Collies need to be brushed regularly to keep the coat healthy and dirt free. Border Collies are also known for their stare. Though their eyes can be brown, amber or blue, it is the Border Collie stare that people remember. This is part of the herding instinct, and a Border Collie will attempt to herd almost anything, including cars and children.

variety.jpg, illustrates the range of appearan...
Illustrates the range of appearance for Border Collies (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Great care must be taken with a Border Collie to ensure it does not hurt itself or others. A fenced in yard and plenty of leash training is a must with this breed. Border Collies are easy to train due to their intelligence, but, because of their desire to work, Border Collies must have work to do. If they are not given tasks to perform and room to roam, they will become bored and destructive.

They must have a lot of stimulation and activity to stay happy. Though good with children, Border Collies may attempt to herd them and, to keep the 'herd' in line, Border Collies have been known to nip. Border Collies usually do not do well with other animals, due to their herding instinct, and can become aggressive with other dogs of the same gender. Border Collies can be excellent household pets, but must be cared for by a family willing to give them the training, attention, care and activities they need. Border Collies are not recommended for people who live in apartments or those who do not plan on spending a lot of time with their pet.


Border Collies do have some breed specific issues. Some are prone to hip dysplasia, PRA (Progressive Retinal Atrophy) and Collie Eye Anomaly. Many Border Collies are allergic to fleas and some are prone to epilepsy and deafness. Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD) is a shoulder lameness that can develop between the ages of 4 to 12 months. Border Collies have also been known to work themselves to exhaustion and suffer from heat stroke in the hot weather.

Because Border Collies are very physically active, they are prone to athletic injuries, such as pulled muscles, cruciate ligament ruptures, cuts and punctures, ripped toenails and footpads.

    By Robert Benjamin - Copyright © 2006 Robert W. Benjamin
    There is a website that has great information on Border Collies and most other breeds of dogs. It has details that pertain to a dog breeds health, grooming, living conditions, best food choices and more, the website is called: Dog And Cat Facts, and can be found at this url =>http://www.dogandcatfacts.com

    Article Source: EzineArticles


Friday, February 26, 2016

Differences Between BORDER COLLIES and COLLIES

Border Collies and Collies are dog breeds often confused with each other. Both were originally bred in England and Scotland as farming and herding dogs. Although they have some similarities, they could not be more different from each other.

The Border Collie originated near the border of Scotland and England, thus the name while standard collies are from Northern England and parts of Scotland. Borders are bred to help herd livestock and help around the farm, they are well known for their intelligence and uncanny ability to find lost members of the herd, making them unique among herding dogs. They are very energetic, athletic and agile; these characteristics combined with being smart make them sure winners in dog sports and sheepdog competitions. It is also because of these characteristics, that they need a lot of physical and mental stimulation. Living in a condo or apartment complex simply will not do for this active dog. They are intelligent working dogs that need to have purpose and lots of activities or they can become depressed. Compared to a standard collie, they are more energetic and need a whole lot more physical activity to keep them happy.

Shasta and Flynn II
Photo by haroldmeerveld

Border Collies are medium sized dogs, weighing about 20lbs to 25lbs with a typical height ranging from 18 to 22 inches depending on the gender. They have a double coat that can be thick or slick with black and white combination as the most common color. Some other color variations include black tri-color, red tri-color, chocolate and the very rare Australian red. The main difference that border collies have with a standard collie is the length of coat; although they have a fair amount of hair it is not nearly as long as the standard collie. Although their ears are somewhat similarly erect or partly erect, their snout is also not as long making them look more like the Australian shepherd.

Collie
Photo by ThreeDee912

The standard Collie come in two varieties, the rough coat, log haired and the smooth coat, short haired collie. They come in black, white, tan and red tri-color combination as well as sable. Predominantly, they have a white coat covering the neck, chest, belly and parts of the legs and face. They are slightly taller that the Border Collie and can reach up to 25 inches. They are also much stockier and can weigh anywhere from 39 to 66 pounds depending on the gender. They are more elegant looking and graceful compared to its rough Border brother. Perhaps because of their size, they are also less active than the Border, although they still need a considerable amount of exercise.

Both dog breeds make for great working dogs, show dogs and pets. They are ideal for an active family that can provide a space for them to run and play. Border Collies and standard collies are also great with children, although they must be trained not to nip them on the ankles. This is a behavior borne out of their herding instincts. They are very loyal and protective of their families and with proper care they can be an excellent addition to the family.

    By Lea Mullins
    Lea Mullins, a dog lover, has discussed the differences between Border Collies and Collies. Visit TrainPetDog.com to learn more about different dog breeds.

    Article Source: EzineArticls