Showing posts with label Canine Arthritis. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Canine Arthritis. Show all posts

Sunday, November 26, 2017

CANINE ARTHRITIS: Early Detection, Signs, and Symptoms That Your Dog Has It

Maestro Show of His Thermotex
Photo by Musespeak
In their youth, our pets love to run, jump and play hard. They rip around the house or yard enjoying life and amusing us. Unfortunately, aging and or genetics takes its toll. Your pet may seem lethargic or not as enthusiastic about going outside anymore. While these symptoms could point to many problems, it would not be uncommon for your pet to be suffering from a common form of joint disease, osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis is as common in pets as it is in people. As with us, age and old injuries takes its toll on our joints, but there are breeds genetically predisposed to various joint problems. Malformed knee or hip joints can bring on inflammation to the affected area. The cartilage protecting and allowing a knee joint to bend and flex smoothly without pain may be deteriorating. Cartilage keeps connecting bone from rubbing together. Without it, the friction of bone on bone contact causes inflammation. Pain levels vary from mild to severe depending on the amount of damage to the cartilage.

As a degenerative disorder, arthritis can and in most cases will get worse over time. It may start out as small pangs of pain that can be easily tolerated, but it can escalate into unbearable, debilitating pain. Our pets can't tell us this of course, but their body language will let you know something is wrong. Early detection can lead to treatments that can reduce inflammation and slow the progression of the disease. The symptoms are easy to spot, but diagnosis by a veterinarian is advised.

So what should you look for? What are the signs that your pet may have a joint disease? For starters, arthritis will definitely affect the mobility of your pet. If you notice them having difficulty moving around, limping, getting up, lying down, jumping on furniture, or perhaps standing on their hind legs to greet you, chances are, pain is slowing them down. Like us, they'll limit mobility to minimize their discomfort. Consulting with your veterinarian is always a good idea, and once diagnosed, treatment can begin.

In the event that your dog is diagnosed with arthritis, are there treatments? Of course, there are, in fact, there are a number of options available to reduce your dog's pain and make it healthier again. The most popular treatment today comes in form of nutraceuticals. Glucosamine combined with chondroitin sulfate are natural substances given as food supplements. These 2 supplements, especially when paired together, are effective in reducing inflammation to the affected joint. Along with its efficacy, glucosamine paired with chondroitin are very safe, with virtually no side effects or dangers to your pet's health. Your vet may initially prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID's) as the treatment to reduce inflammation and pain quickly, but they do come with a laundry list of side effects that can be dangerous to your pet.

Finding out that your dog or cat has arthritis can certainly be worrisome, but with proper treatment, your pet can avoid most if not all of the pain associated with it. Early treatment is beneficial, so take heed of the symptoms and remember to take your pet to the veterinarian for proper diagnosis and treatment. Be sure to mention glucosamine as a treatment if your vet does not.

    By Jack Russel
    If you're looking for a product to give your pet, I highly recommend Synflex for Pets. A leader in the industry, Synflex Liquid Glucosamine offers a complete line of products for people and pets with joint problems associated with arthritis. For over a decade, Synflex delivers on its promise to deliver pain-free joints for your pet. Synflex is affordable, easy to administer, and in my opinion the most effective liquid glucosamine product available for pet arthritis.

    Take a closer look at Synflex for Pets and see if your pet may benefit from its use.

    Article Source: EzineArticles

Wednesday, October 18, 2017


English: A Labrador Retriever standing with hi...
A Labrador Retriever standing with hind legs closes together to compensate 
for weak hips caused by an altered gait from hip dysplasia. 
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Is your dog a little less enthusiastic about his daily walks?  Is he reluctant to get up or lie down?  Do his joints click as he walks?  If so, there’s a chance your buddy is suffering from canine arthritis.

Just as with humans, arthritis in dogs can be one of a variety of types, but the most common is osteoarthritis.

What is Osteoarthritis and what causes it?

Cartilage in joints acts as a buffer between bones. Sometimes, that cartilage degrades and deteriorates, reducing the buffer between bones, sometimes to the point where there is direct bone-to-bone contact, which is extremely painful for the dog.

There is no single cause of arthritis.  Genetics and breeding have made certain breeds more susceptible to hip dysplasia, which often leads to arthritis.  Obesity in dogs can also contribute to arthritic conditions.  Sometimes young dogs can suffer from arthritis if their bones don’t develop correctly.  An injury to a limb can also result in arthritis later in life.


If your dog displays some of the following symptoms, you should consult a veterinarian regarding the possibility of canine arthritis:

·    Inactivity
·    Favoring of one limb
·    Reluctance to get up or lie down
·    Clicking of joints
·    Visible pain when walking
·    Swelling of Joints
·    Whimpering/Crying
·    Reluctance to climb stairs
·    Stiffness after getting up


There is no cure for canine arthritis.  Generally, treatment is dedicated to reducing the inflammation, and managing the pain.  You and your veterinarian should decide whether prescribed drugs are warranted.

Glucosamine and Chondroitin have shown good results in reducing the inflammation, and therefore the pain, in the joints in many dogs.  Commercial supplements providing this combination include Cosequin and Arthogen, among others. They are available without a prescription.

Changing the animal’s diet might also help.  For overweight dogs, a “light” product may be in order.  Some pet owners may prefer to go the all-natural route, while others might consider dog food that contains Glucosamine and Chondroitin.

Alternative treatments, such as acupuncture and chiropractic have also had positive results for some arthritic canines.

What Can I Do to Make my Arthritic Dog More Comfortable?

If your dog shows signs of arthritis in his neck or shoulders, raise his food and water bowl by using a stand or “dog diner”.

When the weather is cold or damp, keep your buddy cozy and warm.

Apply moist heat to arthritic joints, in the form of a hot towel, or a towel-wrapped hot water bottle. Never use a heating pad, as it could lead to accidental burning.

Utilize ramps instead of stairs when possible.

Maintain a reasonable activity level. Exercise and mild activity will help stop joints from deteriorating further.


The sad fact is, that once a dog develops arthritis, he will suffer with it for the rest of his life, and all that can be done for him is to make him as comfortable as possible by maintaining a reasonable activity level, feeding the proper diet, and/or treating with over-the-counter medications, prescribed drugs, or holistic remedies. And a lot of love.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

ARTHRITIS IN DOGS – What You Can Do To Help Your Dog

Canine Arthritis is a common ailment as dog’s age. It is similar to humans as calcification and inflammation cause joint pain and reduced activity. Some forms of arthritis like Canine Hip Dysplasia can develop early in life due to genetics and diet.  Fortunately, arthritis in dogs can be treated.

English: Bilateral hip dysplasia in a Labrador...
Bilateral hip dysplasia in a Labrador Retriever puppy. The left hip (positioned on the right side in the X-ray) is worse than the right hip, with only slight coverage of the head of the femur by the acetabulum.
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Treatments for canine arthritis range from natural supplements using chondroitin and glucosamine, to veterinary prescribed drugs such as Rimadyl and Deramaxx.  Studies and actual results have shown that natural supplements can be extremely effective in fighting the effects of arthritis in dogs without the potentially dangerous side effects of Rimadyl and Deramaxx.  Before deciding which treatment option is best for your dog, you should observe the signs of dog arthritis.

Signs of Dog Arthritis

1.  Limping and general reduced activity.

2.  Favoring one or both of the front or back limbs.

3.  Morning activity or cold weather makes the dog less active.

4.  Difficulty rising from a resting position, especially in the morning.

5.  Pain to the touch.

6.  Reluctance to jump.

If you suspect your dog has arthritis, you should know the different forms or types of arthritis. The most common disorders are listed below.

Types of Dog Arthritis

1.  Osteoarthritis – Also known as canine arthritis or dog arthritis, it          is the most common form of arthritis and most easily treated.  Develops slowly as the dog ages.

2.  Rheumatoid Arthritis - This is an immune mediated disease and can affect the whole body. Several joints can be affected and the      lameness can come and go without notice. Considered a more serious condition than dog osteoarthritis.

3.  Degenerative Disc Disease - This is where the discs in the      vertebrae develop calcification and become rigid. They become less able to withstand compression. This can lead to a severe injury and paralysis if the discs rupture or become herniated.

4.  Stifle Joint Disorder - This is a condition in which the knee and joint      becomes unstable. This is usually from a stretched or torn ligament. This can also cause the joint cartilage to become damaged and inflamed.

5.  Canine Hip Dysplasia - This is caused by looseness in the socket      connecting the thighbone and hipbone. This development usually      occurs when the dog is young but can develop at any age.  A      common sign is to hear a clicking sound when the dog walks.

Treatment Options

1.  Natural Supplements – Most natural supplements use chondroitin       and/or glucosamine as its primary ingredient.  All of the       glucosamine forms originate and are extracted from shellfish.         Chrondroitin is derived from animal cartilage.  Many products like       Free and Easy for Dogs use glucosamine and chondroitin and       combine additional supplements to provide a synergistic effect.         Besides glucosamine and chondroitin, some of the more popular and effective supplements added are       msm, ester-c, and hyaluronic acid.  Many studies have been done       which have proved the effectiveness of these supplements in       humans.  Dog owners have also reported many positive outcomes for       their dogs using these natural supplements.

2.  Rimadyl & Deramaxx - These drugs are obtained by prescription      only. They are called NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug).      Rimadyl was introduced by Pfizer Pharmaceuticals in January      1997 to help treat dogs with inflammation and pain associated with      surgery or canine arthritis. It is effective but it must be used with      caution. Search Google for  "What Your Vet May Not Tell You About Rimadyl" for more detailed information.      At a minimum, you need to have blood work done to monitor the liver enzymes to      ensure your dog doesn't have a toxic reaction to the drugs.

3.  Surgery - Surgery can be an easy decision or a very difficult      decision. Often, money is a concern and some surgeries like disc      surgery can cost around $3,500. Often, the age of the dog has to      be considered when making this decision. And the outlook and      prognosis is very important.  You do not want the dog to suffer      unnecessarily. At the very least, you should only consider surgery      after ensuring an accurate diagnosis has been made.  This may      involve taking x-rays and a myelogram. A myelogram is done by      injecting dye in the spinal canal to enable your doctor to detect      abnormalities of the spine, spinal cord, or surrounding structures.

Summary - Dog Arthritis can be a very debilitating disease if left untreated. Dog owners should pay close attention to their animals and take prompt action when symptoms are noticed. Often a natural supplement is all that is needed to help your dog.  Sometimes more aggressive treatments are needed such as surgery.  The most important thing is to notice and diagnose the problem and then decide what treatment is best for your dog.

Copyright 2006 William Smith