Showing posts with label Vaccination. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Vaccination. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

VACCINATION And Its Important Role In A Dog’s Life

Active immunization is the introduction into the body of killed or satisfied microorganisms or their products for the purpose of stimulating the body’s defense mechanism. This concept is also applicable to other species like the dogs.

Before, the area of veterinary medicine has not yet realized the potential benefits of vaccinations. Until recently, veterinary experts have formulated certain solutions so as to combat the alarming increase of death in digs, in which, most of the causes are viral infection.

With the inception of vaccinations, many dogs were saved from probable death brought about by many diseases like leptospirosis, hepatitis, upper respiratory infections, and parvovirus.


Like humans, dogs need vaccinations too even at an early age. That is why it is important to immunize puppies so that they will survive until they are fully grown up.

Basically, puppies get their immunity from their mother’s milk, which is also the same as that of human beings. However, these immunities tend to lose its effects by the time the puppies are already 6 to 20 weeks old. So, it is during this time that they have to be immunized.

Hence, in order to protect the puppies against infectious diseases, it is best to give them their shots and should be re-immunized after 3 to 4 weeks. In this way, the puppies will be able to endure any infectious disease that may come their way.

Rabies and Immunization

Rabies is an acute and almost invariably fatal disease communicated to man through the saliva of a rabid animal, usually dogs, foxes, squirrels, and bats.

Dogs, fortunately, always present evidence of the disease before becoming infective. The etiologic agent is an ultramicroscopic virus present in the saliva and the central nervous system.

The course of rabies in dogs is characterized by an incubation period of 20 to 30 days. This is followed by a period of excitement, when the animal becomes vicious. The excitement stage may be evident at all or may be entirely absent. Paralysis then develops, first involving the hind legs and thereafter becoming general. Death occurs within 10 days following the first symptom.

Alternatively, the effects of rabies in human beings can be very fatal as it is with dogs. Hence, in order to avoid these problems, it is best to have your dogs vaccinated with anti-rabies shots.

Consequently, rabies vaccines can be given during the 16th to the 26th week of the puppies. This requires a follow up shot one year after for total protection.

On the other hand, dog owners should take note that not all vaccinations will generate adverse effects on their dogs. So, it is best to always observe your dogs every after vaccination. When certain reactions occur like vomiting, facial swelling, or trembling, it is best to discuss these matters immediately to your veterinarian.

Moreover, certain precautions should also be made when the age of the dogs are taken into consideration. For some guides regarding this matter, here are some tips:

1. The age of puppies

It is best to consider the puppies age before subjecting them to their shots.

For puppies that are 4 to 20 weeks old, their first shots should be given during their 6th to 8th weeks of age. The last shots shall be given on the 14th to 16th week of age. These date apply to all primary vaccines.

For rabies, puppies should be 16 to 26 weeks old.

Lola, My Beagle Puppy

2. For dogs that are 20 weeks old up to 2 years old

During this age, dogs should have received their booster shots already. This is essential so as to lengthen the immunity of the vaccines in the dog’s system. At this stage, additional vaccines are recommended for added protection such as vaccines against bordetella and other newer vaccines.

3. For dogs that are older than 2 years

By this time, the dogs should have been through with their booster shots. What comes next is the annual revaccination. These kinds of vaccines are still recommended so as to lengthen their protection against certain diseases.

The bottom line is that vaccinations are extremely important to your dog’s life. Like the way it functions in human beings, vaccines are needed in order to protect the dogs from imminent risk of acquiring diseases brought about by viruses.

With dog vaccines, you can be assured that your dog will be at its peak of health for a longer period of time, free from any life-threatening diseases. Indeed, with vaccines every life is lengthened.




Tuesday, September 20, 2016

KITTEN VACCINATIONS: Types of Vaccinations

In recent years, the vaccination of cats has become more popular. The three most common vaccines give protection against feline infectious enteritis (FIE), feline influenza (cat flu) and feline leukaemia (FeLV). An initial course of two injections, the first at nine weeks are usually given, and yearly boosters are recommended thereafter.
Feline viral rhinotracheitis infection
Feline viral rhinotracheitis infection (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
FIE causes vomiting and diarrhoea, and the cat develops a very high tenperature. Before the vaccine was introduced, it killed a great many cats by dehydration due to the bowel symptoms. Cat flu is caused by two viruses: the feline rhinotracheitis (FCV). FVR is the more severe of the two, causing coughing, sneezing, and nasal and eye discharges.

FVC has milder discharges but more gum inflammation and mouth ulcers. Neither FCV nor FVR is usually deadly but the infection can linger on in the form of snuffles, and some cats become symptomless carriers of the disease. When stressed, these cats develop mild symptoms and spread the virus.

FeLV suppresses the activity of the cat's immune system, allowing a wide range of symptoms to develop. It often results in the death of the cat after several months of illness. The virus is spread mainly in the cat's saliva. It is a disease of cats that fight a lot, and of cats in large colonies, who share the same food and water bowls. It should not be a threat in a well-run boarding cattery, where the feeding and grooming utensils are properly cleaned, and the cats do not mix with each other.

A vaccine exists against the chlamydial organism, which can cause not only mild eye and nasal symptoms, but more importantly, infertility and abortion. This vacine is used mainly in breeding colonies to protect against infertility.



Tuesday, August 2, 2016

VACCINATING Your PIT BULL TERRIER: Keeping Your Dog Healthy

There are many different vaccines available today that can prevent infection and disease in your Pit Bull. Vaccines are also available that can help keep many diseases and infections from severely affecting your dogs’ health. Vaccination will boost your Pit Bull’s immune system to help him be less susceptible to these diseases.

Pit Bull - Photo by maplegirlie 
Most veterinarians recommend beginning vaccinating your Pit Bull at around eight weeks of age, and continuing every four weeks until around eighteen weeks old. Vaccination against rabies is now a legal requirement for all dog owners. Rabies can be transmitted easily to humans, and there is no cure for the disease once it is contracted. The rabies vaccine is usually given to Pit Bulls at around twelve weeks old, with a booster at one year, then every two years after that.

Many vets also recommend a distemper combination vaccine beginning at six weeks of age and continuing every four weeks until the Pit Bull is around eighteen weeks old. This one vaccine can be used to prevent five different diseases: distemper, parvo, influenza, adenovirus, and coronavirus. Distemper is very contagious, and affects the respiratory and nervous systems. It can cause many problems, including: fever, coughing, diarrhea, seizures, and even possible death. Parvo and coronavirus are more severe in puppies, but can affect dogs of any age. These two diseases usually occur in conjunction with each other, and can cause weight loss, diarrhea, vomiting, and possibly death. Influenza and adenovirus cause a dry hacking cough that can lead to more serious infections, such as pneumonia.

Some owners choose to also vaccinate their Pit Bulls against lyme disease, the first dose usually given at around twelve weeks old. The second dose is given around three weeks after the first, and a booster is needed once a year thereafter. Lyme disease can affect the joints, heart, kidneys, and brain if left untreated.

It is important that you limit your Pit Bull puppy’s contact with other dogs until he has received all of his vaccines to prevent him from getting sick. Occasionally serious side effects from the vaccines may occur, but it is well worth the risk to protect your new Pit Bull from all of these potentially deadly diseases. Annual boosters should be given in a timely manner to ensure your dog will continue to be adequately protected throughout his lifetime. For some vaccines, there are three year boosters now available, but they are not recommended for use until the dog is an adult.



Friday, April 8, 2016

PARVOVIRUS & Discussion Of ASPIRIN For Dogs

English: High mag. Image: Parvovirus infection...
High mag. Image: Parvovirus infection
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
If you want to talk about the parvovirus - often shortened to "parvo" - as it relates to dogs, there are two main categories to consider. Depending on the age of the dog being affected, the virus in question may be associated with the intestines or the heart, both of which are vital for the dog's long-term condition. As serious as this condition is, you may still wonder what it is all about. For those who do not know, here are a few details to consider, aspirin for dogs included.


Like one could imagine with any virus, the way that parvovirus is spread is from one being to the next. When a human or creature comes in contact with an infected dog's waste, they stand the chance of passing that condition along to others. This is even more noteworthy when you consider that the illness in question can last for a number of months in the open air. For this reason, as well as others, the idea of solutions has a greater level of importance.

To some degree, I think that there is help to be had with alternatives to aspirin for dogs. As Assisi Animal Health, in addition to other companies, will tell you, this particular condition can be characterized by a number of symptoms. However, with the discomfort that vomiting and the like can cause, wouldn't it make sense for the aforementioned alternatives to be brought into the fold? It's just a matter of understanding what's safe for dogs to use.

If you want to talk about long-term solutions to this very problem, vaccinations cannot be overlooked. Your dog is unlikely to catch the condition when he or she is young, meaning that you should see your vet for the appropriate shots. For dogs with the parvovirus already, veterinarians may issue antibiotics in addition to extensive therapy sessions. Once these are given and carried out, it's easy to see that your dog's condition will become better.


These are just a few of the essential details to cover when it comes to the parvovirus. Dogs may contract this disease, which makes it all the more important for pet owners to exercise the greatest level of care imaginable. You have to know that a condition like this can only be helped by respectable authorities, veterinarians being the most helpful. Make it a point to consult those in the medical field and, before long, you'll have all of the information and care you could want.